Dib Dab Detail

Dib Dab

A pleasingly palm sized, silver rimmed, porcelain sherbet bowl with handy porcelain dipper.

'Who's a Pretty Boy Then?' Jewellery Stand

Who’s A Pretty Boy Then?

A pretty pastel parrot in slipcast porcelain. He hoardes your earrings and other treasures on his little brass branch.

 

Gimme Some Sugar

Gimme Some Sugar!

The Eat Me; Keep Me series focuses on the notion of self indulgence. In exploring the parallels between ‘valuable’ and ‘everyday’ I have drawn a symmetry of opposites between porcelain and confectionary items; both are similarly self indulgent, inspire desire and are coveted, but both are fundamentally frivolous. We are clearly enticed by the notion of food as a luxury, an indulgence, something a little bit naughty. And why not?

These sugar tongs and bowl have been cast in bone china with the addition of a pair of found vintage silver tongs. And yes, they do work!

Dirty Rotten Peaches

Dirty Rotten Peaches

‘Dirty Rotten Peaches’ are part a body of work entitled Eat Me; Keep Me. The series focuses on the notion of self indulgence. In exploring the parallels between ‘valuable’ and ‘everyday’ I have drawn a symmetry of opposites between porcelain and confectionary items; both are similarly self indulgent, inspire desire and are coveted, but both are fundamentally frivolous. Found objects and fruits are cast in subtly stained porcelain, and details are delicately added using an icing bag. In ‘Dirty Rotten Peaches’ the innocent fruits transform tantalisingly into voluptuous little ladies bottoms sprouting delicate gold leaves and other unmentionable things.

 

Available via Saatchi Online

Blow Me _ Blush Trio - Rebecca Wilson

Blow Me!

Tacky collectible perfume bottles are referenced in the ‘Blow Me’ collection. These pieces show a new direction in my work, and the introduction of a new material and set of processes. A collection of slipcast and stained porcelain figurative ‘bottles’ is complimented by a number that are cast in solid glass in delicious colours to highlight the redundancy of their primary function. These objects have become marginalised from their intended purpose as decanters of sickly scents, and now stand redundant in function, but rich in purpose as covetable ‘collectibles’. The non-functional glass and porcelain pieces are finished off with delicately knitted atomiser bulbs salvaged from vintage perfume bottles. The patina comes from of years of being squeezed by greasy fingers and the disfigured and perished rubber interiors further allude to the now redundant function.

Finest Paperware, Wedgewood Jasper Porcelain

Finest Paperware

The paper cup is an icon of the ‘throwaway culture’ and by imposing classical ceramic styling and transposing materials I aim to highlight and question our tendency towards wasteful consumerism.

One set is hand-built from cast sheets of specially formulated porcelain paperclay slip.
The other is hand-built from cast sheets of handmade paper. They come in two different styles derivitave of traditional ceramic aestheitics. The ‘Jasperware’ version emulates Wedgewood’s iconic range using stained porcelain slip and paper and embossed relief details in white. And the Dutch classic ‘Blue Delft’ is alluded to in hand drawn biro, and digital enamel decals scanned from the original drawings.